GamingUnion.net

Max & The Magic Marker Review

Max & The Magic Marker Review

ff610a; float:left; margin-right:5px;"> Armed with his Magic Marker, Max must traverse through the various puzzles that are encountered by drawing. There's one small hitch though, his marker doesn't have very much ink, and the Monster steals it all whenever he passes a checkpoint. Ink must be collected through items found throughout levels, and it means players have to use their resources wisely. While the puzzles and decisions may start off being relatively simple, it's like night and day towards the end of the game. Initially, players are charged with drawing small bridges to cross depths of water, or creating a see-saw effect to reach higher ground, but puzzles later on have a much larger emphasis on thought and physics. Because a large majority of the puzzles are solved by drawing simple geometric shapes, like lines, circles or squares, it could easily be construed as an effortless affair, but the level design and hazards definitely change that, along with one key factor, time.

There are numerous puzzles that require split-second thinking, and because players simply couldn't draw, remove their drawing, and re-draw quickly enough, the developers added the ability to stop time. It adds a whole new level of depth, as for example, Max can create a straight line which acts as basic top-surface to a conveyor belt. However, as things aren't always simple, when the drawing starts to lose control, Max can jump, freeze time, and re-draw a new line so he can continue his passage. It also means that bridges can be half built, or if Max makes a bad jump, he can stop time, and draw a line to catch himself. The whole concept just promotes the feeling that there is rarely ever one way to solve anything - the key is to get the job done, no matter how much ink is used, or no matter how diabolical the drawing looks.

Max & The Magic Marker Time